Serious Heart Attacks

Heart attacks are a very serious heart condition that ‘attack’ suddenly. They can be characterized by a spectrum of chest pains and discomfort as well as sweating, vomiting and nausia. Sometimes these symptoms can even result in a complete loss of consciousness. Heart attacks occur when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. This interuption causes both death and scarring of the tissue in the local area of the heart.

Due to the fact that the interuption can vary in size, as can the area that is affected. Large or small, heart attacks are serious and often life-threatening. Deemed as such they are a medical emergency which needs immediate attention from an emergency medical service. Staying on top of heart attack symptoms as well as the combination of complete medical history, blood tests and ECG findings are what make up the diagnosis for heart attacks.

In recovery the most important thing is restoring the flow of blood back to the area of the heart that has been interrupted. This is acheived through thrombolysis and/or angioplasty. Thrombolysis is a procedure in which the clot is dissolved in the artery enymatically. Angioplasty is the procedure in which a balloon is used to push open the artery.

Great importance is placed on monitoring for various complications, that could prevent a secondy heart attack. Through this monitoring work is done to help eliminate any risk factors that may exist, which helps to reduce the odds of further heart attacks.











This blog provides general information and discussions about health, exercise and related subjects. The information and other content, or in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be taken as medical advice, nor is the information a substitute for professional expertise. Before commencing an exercise program or a diet, you should consult with a professional such as a medical doctor or licensed fitness coach. The opinions and views expressed on this blog and website may have no relation to those of any university or academic establishment, hospital, health practice or other institution. For more information visit the legal page.